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No Downloads. Views Total views. Actions Shares. Embeds 0 No embeds. No notes for slide. Description this book Emetophobia, the extreme fear of vomiting, can affect just about every aspect of sufferer s life, from everyday considerations what food will be "safe" for me to eat?

Living with Emetophobia: Coping with Extreme Fear of Vomiting [FULL] Emetophobia, the extreme fear of vomiting, can affect just about every aspect of sufferer s life, from everyday considerations what food will be "safe" for me to eat? If you want to download this book, click link in the last page 5.

You just clipped your first slide! Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later. Now customize the name of a clipboard to store your clips. Visibility Others can see my Clipboard. Their efforts to protect themselves from vomiting lead them to avoid many otherwise ordinary parts of life, and can make them a prisoner of their fears.

Some people have had a fear of vomiting most of their lives, and managed to live with it until some life development makes the fear far less manageable for them. In a similar way, the need for a close friend or relative to undergo chemotherapy for cancer often ramps up the fear, because nausea and vomiting is a common side effect of chemotherapy.


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Emetophobia can be successfully treated with exposure therapy. Common exposure exercises include: smells, videos and photographs of vomiting, spitting into a toilet, sitting in the back seat of a car, eating at buffet tables, spinning around to induce sensations of nausea, and so on. Simply reading this article, with its frequent use of the word "vomit", is an early step of exposure, because many people with Emetophobia try to avoid the word. Vomiting is almost always quite unpleasant, and treatment does not seek to change that.

Rather, the aim of treatment is to help people live their lives, and engage in activities that are important to them, without being restricted by an excessive fear of vomiting.

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Don't be fooled by Internet marketers of anxiety products! Emetophobia: The Fear of Vomiting Emetophobia is a fear of vomiting.

The Cycle of Emetophobia A person with Emetophobia goes through a repetitive cycle that's quite similar to the cycle of Panic Disorder. Very Similar to Panic Disorder If you think of vomit phobia as a special case of Panic Disorder, that would be a reasonably good description. Phobic Avoidance People with a chronic fear of vomiting often develop a lot of systematic avoidance in their effort to protect against vomiting.

Treatment Emetophobia can be successfully treated with exposure therapy.

Emetophobia what is it & how do we treat it? - Kati Morton

This wasn't the first time I had experienced depersonalization, but whereas before it would last for a few minutes a time at most, here, it was a constant. I was eventually diagnosed with depression, but I couldn't quite believe it. I wasn't sitting in my room all day crying—to me, naively, that's what depression was. I didn't feel sad.

I just felt nothing, like I was existing rather than living. Even in the depths of this depression, though, the fear and anticipation of vomiting never waned. The danger still felt very real. It took me a couple of months after this episode to take antidepressants and stick with them. I had several months of lying flat on my bed, not moving an inch lest some vomit somehow leak out of my mouth.

I cried silently as I anticipated medication-induced vomiting after taking each tablet. The antidepressant I was prescribed not-so-hilariously had nausea listed as a "very common" side effect, so I spent the entire night after taking the first one shaking and crying in my room, in the dark—in case something brightly-colored might somehow further exacerbate my already horrific nausea—desperately willing my body not to give in.

The idea of death was, and to a much lesser extent now still is, more tolerable to me than vomiting.

Living with Emetophobia: Coping with Extreme Fear of Vomiting by Nicolette Heaton-Harris

Some of my friends noticed there was something wrong when I got depressed—one said that my complexion had changed, that I just "didn't look well"—but previous to this very few people had any insight into my mental health. Those who know mostly found out because they happened to be around me while I was in the middle of a panic attack, at which point I believe I'm on the brink of filling the entire place with torrents of vomit and have run out of fucks to give.

At these moments, when I'm trying to explain myself, everything comes out at lightning speed. I tell them I can't eat outside, that I limit my food, don't travel any more and that my life has been destroyed by my obsessions. While I'm babbling away, my eyes are fixed on the exit the entire time, weighing up whether it would be better to vomit in the room, in the toilet nearby or outside.

If I go outside I might not make it in time, but if I stay here other people might see me vomit.

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Every eventuality is nightmarish. As my mind races, I'll continue telling them about the panic out of desperation, somehow hoping that, in telling them, the fear will melt away. That I will look less insane if I just explain myself. Then, once the panic has subsided, I get swept up in the immediate regret of letting someone else know about my phobia. Traveling really is a perennial struggle—my psychosomatic motion sickness sees to that.

Professor David Veale

It takes me double the time to get anywhere I need to be because I constantly battle with the desire to run back home in case the nausea is a vomit warning. Eating in a restaurant is like being asked to walk across a tightrope suspended above circling sharks.

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I have stopped drinking alcohol and don't go out at night. I won't eat a cooked meal until I know that I won't have to leave the house for the rest of the day, in case I give myself food poisoning.


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